Shark Control Program

The Shark Control Program (SCP) relies on nets or drumlines, or a combination of both, to minimise the threat of shark attack on humans in particular locations.

Learn more about the SCP by viewing the Shark Control Program video.

Queensland's beaches are great places to swim and surf. However, it is important to be aware that sharks inhabit our coastline, as well as estuaries, rivers, creeks, canals and streams.

Prior to 1962, regular shark attacks at beaches led the Queensland Government to investigate the most practical and cost-effective methods of preventing shark attacks.

Trials were first conducted in South-East Queensland using baited hooks (known as drumlines) and large mesh fishing nets. The trials clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of the equipment, which was subsequently introduced at major beaches along the Queensland coast.

The shark control program (SCP) relies on nets or drumlines, or a combination of both, to minimise the threat of shark attack on humans in particular locations. It is not designed to provide a distinct barrier between sharks and humans.

It is important to reduce the inadvertent impacts of the SCP on other marine animals (bycatch) without compromising human safety. Bycatch levels are carefully monitored and research is focused on minimising impacts on non-target species.

Shark Hotline

If you notice that an animal has been entangled in shark control equipment, contact the 24-hour Shark Hotline on 1800 806 891 (free call within Queensland).

Last updated 10 May 2013